Vauxhall Cavalier

Who the Hell Would Dream of Owning a Vauxhall Cavalier?

Imagine you are a 10-year-old in the mid-nineties.

What car would you dream about owning?

A Ferrari F40 perhaps or a Lamborghini Diablo?

Chances are a Vauxhall Cavalier was not high on your list of dream cars.

That is, unless you are me.

Yep, that’s right, a Vauxhall Cavalier with the 1992 – 1995 facelift was a car I fell in love with during the 1990’s and still to this day for some unbeknown reason the car still stirs emotions within me.

Was it the incredibly dull looks? Or maybe the rip-roaring 1.4L petrol engine? I didn’t even care what model either, the much sportier and powerful SRi with a 2.0L sixteen valve engine under the bonnet.

It just had to be the facelifted Mk III model.

So, imagine my disappointment when in October 1995 Vauxhall announced the end of the Cavalier after 20-years in favor of its latest model the Vauxhall Vectra.

(Vauxhall Vectra replaces Cavalier)

However, the story of the Cavalier is one of great success for Vauxhall.

The mark 1 first game into the spotlight in 1975 and was rated by What Car Magazine as being better than rivals the Ford Cortina MKIII and Morris Marina.

In 1981 the Mark II was released with production running for seven years until 1988 with the car highly praised for its fuel economy and performance.

However, in 1987, Ford powered ahead in the sales charts with their Sierra selling over 140,000 with the Cavalier dropping below the 100,000 mark.

Thus, the birth of the Mark III and in 1990 outsold the popular Sierra.

1992 was arguably the most successful year for the Vauxhall Cavalier as it went on to become the second biggest selling car in the UK with only the Ford Escort proving more popular, but the Cavalier retained top spot in its sector until Ford released the Mondeo in 1994.

My favourite facelifted MKIII came into existence in 1992 with no fewer than 14 ranges of the vehicle including the SRi, Turbo, and GLS models.

In October 1995, production ceased in favour of the Vauxhall Vectra but over the Cavalier’s twenty-year career over 1.8 million were sold making it Britain’s fifth most popular car of all time.

Classic.

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